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Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

Infrastructure in East and Southeast Europe in Comparative Perspective: Past, Present and Future

8th Annual Conference of the Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS).
Plakat

Hybrid
Datum
: Donnerstag, 23.09. bis Freitag, 24.09.2021
Zeit: siehe Programm
Ort: Online via Zoom (Meeting-ID: 884 439 7929, Kenncode: 337230) / Leibniz-Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 319).
Gäste sind online willkommen, der Besuch der Tagung vor Ort ist diesmal leider nicht möglich.
Programm

Online
Datum
: dienstags, 5.10., 12.10., 19.10.2021, jeweils um 16 Uhr
Zeit: siehe Programm
Ort: Online via Zoom (Meeting-ID: 824 5820 1575, Kenncode: 797053).
Programm

Call for papers: State Descriptions Revisited: Historical Forms of Territorial Representations, 18-21th centuries

Organizers: Borbála Zsuzsanna Török (Centre for Global Cooperation Research, University Duisburg-Essen) and Guido Hausmann (IOS Regensburg).
Dates: 20-21 January 2022
Location: Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS), Regensburg, Germany
Call for papers
Submission deadline: 30 September 2021

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Aktuelles – Details

6. September 2021
Publikationen

IOS Working Papers No. 392 ist erschienen

Feicheng Wang, Zhe Liang, and Hartmut Lehmann, Import Competition and Informal Employment: Empirical Evidence from China, 58 S., September 2021.

This paper investigates the effects of trade liberalisation induced labour demand shocks on informal employment in China. We employ a local labour market approach to construct a regional measure of exposure to import tariffs by exploiting initial differences in industrial composition across prefectural cities and then link it with the employment status of individuals. Using three waves of household survey data between 1995 and 2007, our results show that workers from regions that experienced a larger tariff cut were more likely to be employed informally. Further results based on firm-level data reveal a consistent pattern; tariff reductions increased the share of informal workers within firms. Such effects are more salient among smaller and less productive firms. Our findings suggest an important margin of labour market adjustment in response to trade shocks in developing countries, i.e. employment adjustment along the formal-informal dimension.