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Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

7th IOS Annual Conference: Firms and Social Change in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe. Historical, Political and Economic Perspectives
Datum
: Donnerstag, 23.05. bis Samstag, 25.05.2019
Ort
: Leibniz-Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS)
Flyer

Summer Academy 2019: Socioeconomic consequences of climate change, disasters, and extreme events: Individual outcomes, regional development, and mitigation policies.

11th Joint IOS/APB/EACES Summer Academy on Central and Eastern Europe.
Dates: July 8-10, 2019
Location: Akademie für Politische Bildung Tutzing on Lake Starnberg near Munich
Call for papers

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Aktuelles – Details

26. April 2018
Vorträge

How immigration grease is affected by economic, institutional and policy contexts: evidence from EU labor markets

Ein Vortrag von Martin Kahanec (CEU, Budapest)   im Rahmen der Seminarreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS.
Datum: 26. April 2018 (Donnerstag, Beginn 14 Uhr!)
Zeit: 14.00 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 109)

Theoretical arguments and previous country-level evidence indicate that immigrants are more fluid than natives in responding to changing labor shortages across countries, skill-groups or industries. The diversity across EU member states enables us to test this hypothesis across various institutional, economic and policy contexts. Drawing on the EU LFS and EU SILC datasets we study the relationship between residual wage premia as a measure of labor shortages in different skill-industry-country cells and the shares of migrants and natives working in these cells. We find that immigrants’ responsiveness to labor market shortages exceeds that of natives in the EU15, in particular in member states with higher unemployment rates, higher levels of (recent) immigration, and more open immigration and integration policies; but also those with barriers to citizenship acquisition or family reunification. Whereas higher welfare expenditures seem to exert a lock-in effect, a comparison across different types of welfare states indicates that institutional complementarities neutralize that effect.