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Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

Summer Academy 2018. Firm Behavior in Central and Eastern Europe: Productivity, Innovation and Trade

10th Joint IOS/APB/EACES Summer Academy on Central and Eastern Europe. Organized by the Leibniz-Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS Regensburg) in cooperation with the Akademie für Politische Bildung Tutzing (APB) and the European Association for Comparative Economic Studies (EACES). 
Dates: June 11-13, 2018 
Location: Akademie für Politische Bildung Tutzing on Lake Starnberg near Munich
Program

Social Policy in East and Southeast Europe in Past and Present. Demographic Challenges and Patterns of Inclusion and Exclusion

6 IOS Annual Conference 2018.
Dates: 21 June – 23 June 2018
Location: IOS Regensburg, Landshuter Str. 4
Plakat
Flyer

Regensburger Vorträge zum östlichen Europa

Die einzelnen Termine und Vortragsthemen im Frühjahr-/Sommerprogramm 2018 entnehmen Sie bitte dem Plakat.

Seminarreihe des Arbeitsbereichs Ökonomie am IOS

Zeit: Dienstag, 13.30–15.00 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 109)
Programm Sommer 2018

Forschungslabor: „Geschichte und Sozialanthropologie Südost‐ und Osteuropas“

Zeit: Donnerstag, 14–16 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 017)
Programm Sommersemester 2018

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Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Aktuelles – Details

12. Dezember 2017
Vorträge

Immigration and Redistribution: Evidence from 8 Million Forced Migrants

Ein Vortrag von Benjamin Elsner (IZA) im Rahmen der Seminarreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS.
Datum: 12. Dezember 2017
Zeit: 13.30 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 109) 

This paper shows that immigration can have a profound and persistent impact on redistribution. We illustrate this based on the sudden arrival of 8 million forced migrants in West Germany in the aftermath of World War II. These migrants, after having lost all their assets, were much poorer than the population in West Germany, but had full voting rights from the time of arrival. Based on panel data for 400 West German cities, we show that cities responded to this inflow by raising business taxes and taxes on farmland, while leaving property and wage bill taxes unchanged. Further analysis suggests that these results can be explained by changes in local voting patterns. We further document a long-lasting impact of this mass immigration on people's preferences for redistribution today. People living today in places with high inflows in the 1940s display markedly stronger preferences for a large government.