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Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

Europa und wir

Vortragsreihe „Offene Hochschule“.

Veranstalter: Volkshochschule der Stadt Regensburg in Kooperation mit dem Leibniz-Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung und der Universität Regensburg
Datum: Oktober 2017 bis Februar 2018
Zeit: Jeweils um 19.30 Uhr
Ort: in der Lesehalle der Stadtbücherei, Haidplatz 8, 93047 Regensburg
Flyer
Plakat

Seminarreihe des Arbeitsbereichs Ökonomie am IOS

Zeit: Dienstag, 13.30–15.00 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 109)
Programm Wintersemester 2017/18

Forschungskolloquium: „Geschichte und Sozialanthropologie Südost‐ und Osteuropas“

Zeit: Donnerstag, 14–16 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 017)
Programm Wintersemester 2017 / 2018

Summer Academy 2018. Firm Behavior in Central and Eastern Europe: Productivity, Innovation and Trade

10th Joint IOS/APB/EACES Summer Academy on Central and Eastern Europe. Organized by the Leibniz-Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS Regensburg) in cooperation with the Akademie für Politische Bildung Tutzing (APB) and the European Association for Comparative Economic Studies (EACES). 
Dates: June 11-13, 2018 
Location: Akademie für Politische Bildung Tutzing on Lake Starnberg near Munich
Call for papers  
Submission deadline: March 18, 2018

Social Policy in East and Southeast Europe in Past and Present. Demographic Challenges and Patterns of Inclusion and Exclusion

6 IOS Annual Conference 2018.
Dates: 21 June – 23 June 2018
Location: IOS Regensburg, Landshuter Str. 4

Call for Participants
The application deadline is January 19, 2018

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Aktuelles – Details

6. November 2017
Publikationen

IOS Working Papers No. 370 ist erschienen

Getting Incentives Right: Human Capital Investment and Natural Resource Booms, Gerhard Toews and Alexander Libman, 36 S., IOS Working Papers 370, Oktober 2017.

The accumulation of human capital is usually considered an important corner stone in a country’s economic development. While the use of resource rents to improve an educational system and, thus, increase the level of human capital appears to be an attractive option, resource rich economies frequently struggle with an efficient management of resource revenues. In this paper, we ask whether private individuals can at least partly compensate for government’s failures by analysing the consequences of a resource boom on private demand for education. To do this we use the Household Budget Survey of Kazakhstan covering the period of 2001–2005. The oil boom provides us with the necessary exogenous variation to establish causality. We show that, in resource-rich districts of Kazakhstan, the resource boom increases the probability of employment in the formal sector for the educated labour force and the likelihood that households pay tuition fees for tertiary education. We are able to refute the conjecture that our effect is driven merely by the growing income of the households, by the growing supply of educational opportunities or by the immigration of educated households.