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Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

Regensburger Vorträge zum östlichen Europa

Die einzelnen Termine und Vortragsthemen entnehmen Sie bitte dem Plakat.
Detaillierte Informationen zu den einzelnen Vorträgen finden Sie hier.

7th IOS Annual Conference: Firms and Social Change in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe. Historical, Political and Economic Perspectives
Datum
: Donnerstag, 23.05. bis Samstag, 25.05.2019
Ort
: Leibniz-Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS)
Flyer
Plakat
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Summer Academy 2019: Socioeconomic consequences of climate change, disasters, and extreme events: Individual outcomes, regional development, and mitigation policies.

11th Joint IOS/APB/EACES Summer Academy on Central and Eastern Europe.
Dates: July 8-10, 2019
Location: Akademie für Politische Bildung Tutzing on Lake Starnberg near Munich
Call for papers

Seminarreihe des Arbeitsbereichs Ökonomie am IOS

Zeit: Dienstag, 13.30–15.00 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 109)
Programm

Forschungslabor: „Geschichte und Sozialanthropologie Südost‐ und Osteuropas“

Zeit: Donnerstag, 14–16 Uhr
Ort: WiOS, Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 017)
Programm Sommersemester 2019

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Events - Details

7. May 2019
Lectures

Self-Selection Into Public Service When Corruption is Widespread: Evidence from Post-Soviet Russia

Ein Vortrag von Dmitriy Vorobyev (Ural Federal University and CERGE-EI Prague) im Rahmen der Seminarreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS.
Datum: 7. Mai 2019
Zeit: 13.30 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 109)

Drawing on experimental games and surveys conducted with students at two universities in Russia, we compare the behavioral, attitudinal, and demographic traits of students seeking public sector employment to the traits of their peers seeking jobs in the private sector. Contrary to similar studies conducted in other high-corruption contexts, such as India, we find evidence that students who prefer a public sector career display less willingness to cheat or bribe in experimental games as well as higher levels of altruism. One interpretation of these findings is that corruption in Russia results from the transformation of bureaucrats’ behavior and attitudes after entering the civil service, rather than through a process of corrupt self-selection. Another interpretation is that despite widespread corruption, state employment in Russia genuinely attracts at least some of the younger generation for idealistic reasons beyond personal enrichment or job security. Implications of these and other interpretations for the creation of effective anti-corruption policies and for understanding of state capacity in contexts where corruption is widespread are discussed.