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Research – Events - Publications

Call for Applications: Workshop “Human Rights Empowerment – Researching and Teaching Human Rights in Central Asia”

Workshop for civil society activists and practitioners
Organizers: Anja Mihr (OSCE Academy), Cindy Wittke (IOS)
Dates: 6–8 October 2021
Location: OSCE Academy in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic
Funding: German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)
Submission deadline: 15 August 2021
Details: Call for applications (pdf)

Call for applications: Workshop “Human Rights in Central Asia: Troubled Nexuses between Internationalization, Nation Building and Civil Society”

International workshop for young academics and scholars
Organizers: Anja Mihr (OSCE Academy), Cindy Wittke (IOS)
Dates: 4–6 October 2021
Location: OSCE Academy in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic
Funding: German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)
Submission deadline: 15 August 2021
Details: Call for applications (pdf)

Call for papers: State Descriptions Revisited: Historical Forms of Territorial Representations, 18-21th centuries

Organizers: Borbála Zsuzsanna Török (Centre for Global Cooperation Research, University Duisburg-Essen) and Guido Hausmann (IOS Regensburg).
Dates: 20-21 January 2022
Location: Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS), Regensburg, Germany
Call for papers
Submission deadline: 30 September 2021

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

News – Details

15. June 2021
Talks

Firms, Kinship and Economic Growth in the Kyrgyz Republic

Ein Vortrag von Theodore P. Gerber (University of Wisconsin-Madison) im Rahmen der Seminarreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS.
Datum: Dienstag, 15. Juni 2021
Zeit: 16.00 Uhr!
Ort: Online via Zoom, Anmeldung

The paper addresses whether kinship networks promote or impede entrepreneurship in the Kyrgyz Republic. We conducted a survey of firm managers/entrepreneurs about their business networks, resources they receive from and provide to their contacts, their firm's performance, and the business environment they face. Our data indicate that receiving help from kin connections increases profitability, while providing help to kin decreases it. While kin-reliant firms grow slower than firms with a lower degree of kin assistance, the former grow faster than firms that do not have access to business networks. In addition, kin connections and firm performance are unrelated for firms that have adopted best business practices. Our results demonstrate that directly measuring both receipt and provision of help from/to kin helps resolve the ambiguity of findings in the broader literature regarding the net effects of kin networks on firm performance: the two forms of network use are positively correlated, yet have opposite effects.