BEGIN:VCALENDAR PRODID:-//Microsoft Corporation//Outlook 16.0 MIMEDIR//EN VERSION:2.0 METHOD:PUBLISH X-MS-OLK-FORCEINSPECTOROPEN:TRUE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:W. Europe Standard Time BEGIN:STANDARD DTSTART:16011028T030000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=-1SU;BYMONTH=10 TZOFFSETFROM:+0200 TZOFFSETTO:+0100 END:STANDARD BEGIN:DAYLIGHT DTSTART:16010325T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=-1SU;BYMONTH=3 TZOFFSETFROM:+0100 TZOFFSETTO:+0200 END:DAYLIGHT END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VEVENT CLASS:PUBLIC CREATED:20200608T093726Z DESCRIPTION:Ein Vortrag von Andreas Backhaus (Bundesinstitut für Bevölker ungsforschung [BiB]) im Rahmen der Seminarreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS .\nDatum: 16. Juni 2020 \nZeit: 13.30 Uhr\nOrt: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS) \, online via Zoom\, link wird mit den Einladungen verschickt! \nThis pape r studies the longevity of historical legacies in the context of the forma tion of human capital. The Partitions of Poland (1772-1918) represent a na tural experiment that instilled Poland with three different legacies of ed ucation\, resulting in sharp differences in human capital among the Polish population. I construct a large\, unique dataset that reflects the state of schooling and human capital in the partition territories from 1911 to 1 961. Using a spatial regression discontinuity design\, I find that primary school enrollment differs by as much as 80 percentage points between the partitions before WWI. However\, this legacy disappears within the followi ng two decades of Polish independence\, as all former partitions achieve u niversal enrollment. Differences in educational infrastructure and g ender access to schooling simultaneously disappear after WWI. The level of literacy converges likewise across the former partitions\, driven by a high intergenerational mobility in education. After WWII\, the former par titions are not distinguishable from each other in terms of education anym ore.\n DTEND;TZID="W. Europe Standard Time":20200616T153000 DTSTAMP:20200608T093726Z DTSTART;TZID="W. Europe Standard Time":20200616T133000 LAST-MODIFIED:20200608T093726Z LOCATION:ZOOM PRIORITY:5 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY;LANGUAGE=de:Fading legacies: Human capital in the aftermath of the partitions of Poland TRANSP:OPAQUE UID:040000008200E00074C5B7101A82E00800000000E0DE981D893DD601000000000000000 0100000006B1D18B7D66C9D4CB92EE804068E87F8 X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:< body lang=DE link="#0563C1" vlink="#954F72" style='tab-interval:35.4pt'>

Ein Vortrag von Andreas Backhaus (Bundesinstitut für Bevölkerungsforschung [BiB]) im Rahmen der Semin arreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS.
Datum: 16. Juni 2020
Zeit: 13.30 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institu t für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS)\, online via Zoom\, link wird mit den Einladungen verschickt!

This paper studies the lo ngevity of historical legacies in the context of the formation of human ca pital. The Partitions of Poland (1772-1918) represent a natural experiment that instilled Poland with three different legacies of education\, result ing in sharp differences in human capital among the Polish population. I c onstruct a large\, unique dataset that reflects the state of schooling and human capital in the partition territories from 1911 to 1961. Using a spa tial regression discontinuity design\, I find that primary school enrollment differs by as much as 80 percentage points be tween the partitions before WWI. However\, this legacy disappears within t he following two decades of Polish independence\, as all former partitions achieve universal enrollment. \; Difference s \; in \; educational \; infrastructure \; and \; gen der \; access \; to \; schooling simultaneously disappear afte r WWI. The level of literacy converges likewise across the former partitio ns\, driven by a high intergenerational mobility in education. After WWII\ , the former partitions are not distinguishable from each other in terms o f education anymore.

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