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Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

Infrastructure in East and Southeast Europe in Comparative Perspective: Past, Present and Future

8th Annual Conference of the Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS).
Plakat

Hybrid
Datum
: Donnerstag, 23.09. bis Freitag, 24.09.2021
Zeit: siehe Programm
Ort: Online via Zoom (Meeting-ID: 884 439 7929, Kenncode: 337230) / Leibniz-Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4 (Raum 319).
Gäste sind online willkommen, der Besuch der Tagung vor Ort ist diesmal leider nicht möglich.
Programm

Online
Datum
: dienstags, 5.10., 12.10., 19.10.2021, jeweils um 16 Uhr
Zeit: siehe Programm
Ort: Online via Zoom (Meeting-ID: 824 5820 1575, Kenncode: 797053).
Programm

Call for papers: State Descriptions Revisited: Historical Forms of Territorial Representations, 18-21th centuries

Organizers: Borbála Zsuzsanna Török (Centre for Global Cooperation Research, University Duisburg-Essen) and Guido Hausmann (IOS Regensburg).
Dates: 20-21 January 2022
Location: Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS), Regensburg, Germany
Call for papers
Submission deadline: 30 September 2021

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Institutions in a Time of Extremes: Local Administration in Bessarabia and Transnistria (1939–1945)

Bearbeiterin: Dr. Svetlana Suveica
Laufzeit: May 2015 - April 2018
Förderung:
Supported by Fritz Thyssen Stiftung

The aim of the research project is to reconstruct the profile and the activity of the institutions of local public administration in the historical regions of Bessarabia and Transnistria (today the Republic of Moldova and Southern Ukraine) during World War II.

The research hypothesis is that rather than being passive executors of orders, local public institutions possessed agency. Ensuring people's demands for bread and shelter remained their daily priority, regardless of the Romanian or the Soviet regime. When the Romanian regime 'left' and the Soviet one 'came', and vice versa, local institutions underwent only a structural transformation. Simultaneously, the public servants who possessed vernacular knowledge about the society and were responsible for day-to-day activity manoeuvred between tests of their loyalty and exploited the transitional power vacuum for their personal benefit. Under both the Romanian and the Soviet regimes, they perpetuated conflict and supported extreme violence. Despite the rupture between regimes that declared themselves mutually exclusive, there was also continuity, ensured by local institutions that acted as binding links in a time of extremes. Restoring the links between mutually exclusive regimes would lead toward the reconstruction of an 'entangled' wartime history of the East European borderland.